A DVR Program Brings Realization to Talking Phones

Smartphones have offered a great deal of convenience and versatility for business people, but there’s one feature that has been a problem: the voice dialing function. VoIP, as it’s also called, lacks fluidity and there …

Smartphones have offered a great deal of convenience and versatility for business people, but there’s one feature that has been a problem: the voice dialing function. VoIP, as it’s also called, lacks fluidity and there are times when you’re unable to use it to leave a message, reach a phone number, or have your voice mail answered. With cloud technology, however, these problems may be resolved.

A DVR program, such as VeloVoice, allows a person with a personal digital assistant to record voice messages in an email box. The user of the digital assistant can dictate the message, saying it on the phone through the software. The digital assistant can then be listening to the message, which it recognizes, and speak it out loud to the recipient.

The assistant lets you dictate the content of a voice message and the recipient hears it through their headphones. So you can’t even leave a voice message on a voicemail box. The box remains blank and you have full access to the message. A person can answer a call by similarly speaking into a microphone.

The issue with VeloVoice, which is from a different company, is that it doesn’t allow you to record a message unless you’ve selected to record it. You must press the button to record and the person on the other line-side is not seen. This means that if you wanted to make a recording of a previous message, for example, you would have to press the button and speak the same message out loud before you leave the message.

VeloVoice, which sells both software and a device, costs about $149 and can be bought online. It is compatible with most telephones and light-duty PDAs, although some PDAs with more sophisticated voice commands may have problems with it. The VeloVoice product also includes four additional touch-screen displays, one on each side of the device.

The VeloVoice demo on the video shown below shows the four touch-screen displays. In the demo, the user can wave his hand over the four screens, and the four screens will turn on and display information as shown in the video.

Videos

A third video, from YouTube, shows the same four panels but with sounds. Here is a link to that video.

Videos can be found on YouTube from time to time, and if you search for the video, you can find several others from public places, such as HTTP://www.google.com/video/watch?hl= raining&lr=365

There are several search engines, including Google Video, which brings the most popular videos from a variety of browsers. These include Google Earth, Google Talk, Googleazines, Google+, and Google Play.

Setting up

Setting up a Google Video account is easy. Once you sign up for a Google account, you can choose to share videos from any account or a specific account.

sharing feels good

Google has made sharing content easy since it lets you easily send a video greeting card, reminded me of my grandmother’s cancer diagnosis, or told me about a new invention my kids want me to speak about.

Another benefit I appreciate is that I can set up a video blog called “Yogurt Memes.” Blogs are defined as posts on Google Video, worthy of sharing, that users can then share with their friends.

Because of the popularity of the meme generator, when you upload your own LOL or Failafe emoticon, you are automatically invited to share it with the world.

More emoticons are available than are typical post-office emoticons. These are defined as sad, scaly, glasses, big, little, disgruntled, Carney, woof, and eyepatch.